Why are Metaphors Both Awesome and Terrible?


Miss Metaphor! Image from Wikipedia Commons.

Miss Metaphor! Image from Wikipedia Commons.

One dreadful  inspiring morning at a writing seminar, I emerged from a face-to-face editor session feeling as though I were stepping out the door and onto a parade float. For a few minutes, I could have sworn I was wearing a pageant gown, a tiara, and a ribbon sash proclaiming I was Miss Metaphor, and not in a good way.

Said editor had reviewed the first pages of my first novel and practically stamped that lofty title *Miss Metaphor* on my chest.

I emerged from the room fluttering a weak little Miss America wave at the other terrified aspiring writers awaiting their turns at the chopping block.

That experience caused me to

  • Greatly revise my manuscript, and
  • Wonder why metaphors are both awesome and terrible

With a little research, I found a true Metaphor Devotee — Italian semiotician, literary critic, and novelist Emberto Eco, who said, “…metaphor gives birth to pleasure (in writing).”

He claims that knowing how to conceive metaphors is an art.

I agree.

Metaphors, and their cousins – simile, hyperbole, allegory – add punch to pallid writing. They enlighten and freshen dull manuscripts.

Too Many Metaphors

Some writers (Jodi Lea Stewart in the past, for example) are addicted to figurative language. Consider the following paragraph, and yes, I wrote it myself, and furthermore, it was easy because I could almost live inside a metaphor but that’s another story, n’est-ce pas?

The female fire hazard blazed her way into the board meeting – bull nostrils flaring, poblano pepper eyes glowing – and roared at the Sovereign Power himself, “Give me back my job or I’ll torch your underwear from the inside out!”

Thirty-nine words, twenty-one of which indicate some kind of metaphor.

That’s overkill.

Writers who use metaphors to that extent might want to hook up with a 12-step Metaphors Anonymous program sooner versus later. Over metaphorizing *I made that up to add interest* dulls out the reader almost as much as the writer who doesn’t use figurative language at all.

Too Few Metaphors

If Elements of Style by Strunk & White make you salivate…

If you love stringent grammar rules and feel it is a crime to alter them…

If you use symbolic language ultra-sparingly, or not at all…

If you wallow in strict English correctness…

Stop reading this blog.

Grab your Elements of Style and repertoire of grammar books and take a nap with them because you’re boring us all to death  with your writing. Sleep. Just sleep.

However, if you are boring even yourself, and you are often told by readers, agents, or editors that your writing lacks color, excitement, or imagination, then I have a suggestion for you.

Run, don’t walk, to buy Arthur Plotnik’s Spunk & Bite. Read it under the covers with a flashlight if you must, but read it without delay.

Plotnik, a self-defined, writing-rule-rebel said,”Both Strunk and White knew well that bending the rules…can give writing its distinction, its edge, its very style. Bending the rules can spring writers from ruts – get them out of themselves, out of the ordinary, and into prose that comes alive, gets noticed, and gets published.”

Strike the Balance

A sassy blend of metaphor mixed with essential writing rules will let you stand proud on that Miss *Mr?* Metaphor float, or anywhere else. Just as a superb pageant contestant is lovely, well-rounded, and interesting, so is the kind of writing that stands out from the crowd.

“Metaphor is the supreme figure of all…connecting notions and finding similitude in things dissimilar.” – Umberto Eco

What about you? Have you been guilty of too much flowery writing? Did anybody ever tell you to stop? Maybe you abhor metaphors, simile, hyperbole and the like. Tell us about it. We love to hear from you!

When writers share, we just get better.


That dame saw me borrow unauthorized social media. Maybe I can dart under the table...

That dame saw me use unauthorized social media. Maybe I can duck under the table before she calls the coppers.

Pssst! – All media used in my blogs are either acquired by payment for their use, or don’t require licensing for public use. Often, I use my own personal photos. Please play it safe and don’t recycle images, okay? (P.S. This one of Henry Fonda is free for all. Borrow like crazy if you want!)


Know what? I’d be as happy as a lady in a new pair of heels if you would wander around my website a bit! To sign up to receive notices of new blogs, recipes, appearances and media news, leave your email address above. Y’all come back soon. I miss you already! If you like Sassy, Danger and Mystery ...  you'll love my Young-Adult-to-any-age-novels! I hope you’ll pick up a copy of Silki, the Girl of Many Scarves: SUMMER OF THE ANCIENT. It's available at your nearest Barnes & Noble Bookseller, on my website, Amazon, B&N.com and more. For your convenience, it’s also available for Kindlethe Nook and most other eBook readers. Book Two of the Silki series, CANYON OF DOOM, launched right before Christmas. It's available in paperback and all eBook formats. Here's a brief synopsis:

Stealing money isn’t the aim of the Mesa Redondo bank robbers. They want the mysterious metal object Silki and her best friend Birdie discovered in the bogs at Canyon Daacha. With Birdie headed up to Kayenta for the rest of the summer, Silki navigates wide-eyed and solo through a whirl of thievery, scary characters, lost artifacts, and a shadowy stranger Silki dubs “Amber Eyes.” Against a backdrop of Monsoon season floods and quicksand, Silki’s plight is complicated by the hateful slurs of a rebellious cousin her family must rescue before it’s too late. Soon, Silki finds herself smack dab in the middle of a plot stretching all the way back to World War II and reaching right into the very soul of her own family.

I can't wait for you to meet my new Canyon of Doom illustrator, the Drawing Hands!

Jodi Lea Stewart was born in Texas and grew up in Apache County on a cattle ranch near Concho, Arizona. She left the University of Arizona in Tucson to move to San Francisco, where she learned about peace, love and exactly what she didn't want to do with her life. Since then, Jodi graduated summa cum laude with a BS in Business Management, raised two children, worked as an electro-mechanical drafter, penned humor columns for a college periodical, wrote regional western articles and served as managing editor of a Fortune company newsletter. She currently resides in Texas and New Mexico with her husband, two Standard poodles, two rescue cats and numerous gigantic, bossy houseplants. Silki, the Girl of Many Scarves: SUMMER OF THE ANCIENT is her first novel. CANYON OF DOOM is her second novel in the Silki, the Girl of Many Scarves series.

Did My Arizona Childhood Make Me a Fiction Writer?


Jodi at the Grand Canyon

Jodi Lea Stewart, age 8, Grand Canyon.

Exciting news!

Today I am honored and thrilled to be a guest blogger on the awesome, award-winning Grandmother Hen Blog! It’s the coolest site with unique posts and a motto of Visit the Coop to Stay in the Loop! What’s not to love about that?

Since I write novels infused with strange and mysterious events taking place on the Navajo Rez, I thought it might be fun for you to guess whether or not…

…my crazy childhood in the Arizona mountains had anything to do with my becoming a fiction writer. Hmmmm.

Oh, and guess what else?

They’re running a Book Giveaway of autographed copies of my novels from the Silki series, Summer of the Ancient and Canyon of Doom!

When I heard about that, I felt like,

Fotolia photo.

Fotolia image.

It reminded me of riding the Judge Roy Scream at Six Flags Over Texas, which is like,

Grandmother Hen...here I come!

Grandmother Hen…here I come!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But, I digress. Rush on over there before someone else wins all the novels.

https://grandmotherhen.com/2014/02/silki-book-giveaway/

I’ll wait right here for you. I’ve got a pot of beans on the stove, and I’ll fry up some okra and make some cornbread while you’re gone. Hurry back, and let me know what you found out, okay? You know I love to hear from you!

Arrow

Know what? I’d be as country girl at a Saturday night dance if you’d wander around my website a bit! To sign up to receive notices of new blogs, recipes, appearances and media news, leave your email address above. Y’all come back soon. I miss you already!

If you like Sassy, Danger and Mystery …  you’ll love my Young-Adult-to-any-age-novels! I hope you’ll pick up a copy of Silki, the Girl of Many Scarves: SUMMER OF THE ANCIENT. It’s available at your nearest Barnes & Noble Bookseller, on my website, Amazon, B&N.com and more. For your convenience, it’s also available for Kindlethe Nook and most other eBook readers.

Book Two of the Silki series, CANYON OF DOOM, launched right before Christmas. It’s available in paperback and all eBook formats. Here’s a brief synopsis:

Stealing money isn’t the aim of the Mesa Redondo bank robbers. They want the mysterious metal object Silki and her best friend Birdie discovered in the bogs at Canyon Daacha. With Birdie headed up to Kayenta for the rest of the summer, Silki navigates wide-eyed and solo through a whirl of thievery, scary characters, lost artifacts, and a shadowy stranger Silki dubs “Amber Eyes.” Against a backdrop of Monsoon season floods and quicksand, Silki’s plight is complicated by the hateful slurs of a rebellious cousin her family must rescue before it’s too late. Soon, Silki finds herself smack dab in the middle of a plot stretching all the way back to World War II and reaching right into the very soul of her own family.

I can’t wait for you to meet my new Canyon of Doom illustrator, the Drawing Hands!

Pssst! – All media used in my blogs are either acquired by payment for their use, or don’t require licensing for public use. Often, I use my own personal photos. Please play it safe and don’t recycle images, okay? (P.S. This one of Bogie and Pals is free for all. Borrow like crazy if you want!)

You're going to Unauthorized Social Media Borrowing Jail. Mr. Bogart will inform your families.

You’re going to Unauthorized-Social-Media-Borrowing Jail. Mr. Bogart will inform your families.

Jodi Lea Stewart was born in Texas and grew up in Apache County on a cattle ranch near Concho, Arizona. She left the University of Arizona in Tucson to move to San Francisco, where she learned about peace, love and exactly what she didn't want to do with her life. Since then, Jodi graduated summa cum laude with a BS in Business Management, raised two children, worked as an electro-mechanical drafter, penned humor columns for a college periodical, wrote regional western articles and served as managing editor of a Fortune company newsletter. She currently resides in Texas and New Mexico with her husband, two Standard poodles, two rescue cats and numerous gigantic, bossy houseplants. Silki, the Girl of Many Scarves: SUMMER OF THE ANCIENT is her first novel. CANYON OF DOOM is her second novel in the Silki, the Girl of Many Scarves series.

Life Lessons I’ve Learned from Applying Makeup


 

Image from Fotolia

Image from Fotolia

Type-A folks aren’t fond of thinking they’ve wasted time doing anything.

When I heard the average women spends 474 days of her life slapping on lipstick and lining her eyes *applying makeup*, I had to search for purpose in all that mirror time.

Here, then, is my version of life lessons I’ve learned from applying makeup.

  • Scrub out impurities before they turn black.
  • Moisture is the key to life.
  • Always start with a good foundation.
  • Rough handling will stretch you in ways you don’t want to go.
  • Never expect a thin line from a dull pencil.
  • Being too cheeky can backfire.
  • Frowning messes up everything.
  • Practice makes perfect.
  • Too showy gives a false impression.
  • Freshen up often.
  • Inner beauty is the best makeup in the world.

My kids always accused me of turning everything into a life lesson. Maybe they were right!

Have you learned wise things while doing life’s outwardly boring and repetitive tasks…maybe from doing the laundry, or exercising, even shaving your face *guys*?

You know I love to hear from you!

Arrow

I’m thankful for each and every one of you!

Know what? I’d be as happy as a lady in a new pair of heels if you would wander around my website a bit! To sign up to receive notices of new blogs, recipes, appearances and media news, leave your email address above. Y’all come back soon. I miss you already!

If you like Sassy, Danger and Mystery …  you’ll love my Young-Adult-to-any-age-novels! I hope you’ll pick up a copy of Silki, the Girl of Many Scarves: SUMMER OF THE ANCIENT. It’s available at your nearest Barnes & Noble Bookseller, on my website, Amazon, B&N.com and more. For your convenience, it’s also available for Kindlethe Nook and most other eBook readers.

Book Two of the Silki series, CANYON OF DOOM, launched right before Christmas. It’s available in paperback and all eBook formats. Here’s a brief synopsis:

Stealing money isn’t the aim of the Mesa Redondo bank robbers. They want the mysterious metal object Silki and her best friend Birdie discovered in the bogs at Canyon Daacha. With Birdie headed up to Kayenta for the rest of the summer, Silki navigates wide-eyed and solo through a whirl of thievery, scary characters, lost artifacts, and a shadowy stranger Silki dubs “Amber Eyes.” Against a backdrop of Monsoon season floods and quicksand, Silki’s plight is complicated by the hateful slurs of a rebellious cousin her family must rescue before it’s too late. Soon, Silki finds herself smack dab in the middle of a plot stretching all the way back to World War II and reaching right into the very soul of her own family.

I can’t wait for you to meet my new Canyon of Doom illustrator, the Drawing Hands!

Pssst! – All media used in my blogs are either acquired by payment for their use, or don’t require licensing for public use. Often, I use my own personal photos. Please play it safe and don’t recycle images, okay? (P.S. This one of Peter O’Toole is free for all. Borrow like crazy if you want!)

I fled to the sands of Arabia because of my unauthorized media borrowing!

I fled to the sands of Arabia because of my unauthorized media borrowing!

 

 

 

Jodi Lea Stewart was born in Texas and grew up in Apache County on a cattle ranch near Concho, Arizona. She left the University of Arizona in Tucson to move to San Francisco, where she learned about peace, love and exactly what she didn't want to do with her life. Since then, Jodi graduated summa cum laude with a BS in Business Management, raised two children, worked as an electro-mechanical drafter, penned humor columns for a college periodical, wrote regional western articles and served as managing editor of a Fortune company newsletter. She currently resides in Texas and New Mexico with her husband, two Standard poodles, two rescue cats and numerous gigantic, bossy houseplants. Silki, the Girl of Many Scarves: SUMMER OF THE ANCIENT is her first novel. CANYON OF DOOM is her second novel in the Silki, the Girl of Many Scarves series.

Series: Soups On! ~ Homemade Chicken Soup


Fotolia Image

Fotolia Image

Wikipedia says Americans consume approximately 2.5 billion bowls of Campbell’s canned Tomato, Cream of mushroom and Chicken Noodle Soup each year.

Why?

I think it’s because they never tasted good homemade soup. After they do, canned soup *invented in 1897* just doesn’t cut it.

My mission, if I choose to accept it, is to share my best soup recipes so Americans can wean themselves off canned soup. Will it work?

*Almost* Homemade Chicken Soup

  • 2 chicken breasts with bones, skin & some fat removed
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 lg. onion, chopped or sliced
  • 2 stalks celery, including leaves, sliced
  • ½  head cabbage, coarsely sliced
  • 1 large potato cut into chunks
  • 1 large or 2 med. tomatoes
  • 1-8 oz. can mixed vegetables
  • 1 pkg. dry Ramen noodle soup w/seasoning packet
  • 1-1/2 cup uncooked minute rice
  • Store-bought chicken broth, optional

Boil chicken in a large pot with the bay leaf. When thoroughly cooked, remove to a platter to cool. Clean the broth by straining it. I sometimes discard half and use chicken broth for the rest of the liquid.

Add onions, celery, cabbage, potatoes, tomatoes, and the can of mixed vegetables. Simmer until potato chunks are tender. Meanwhile, clean chicken off bones and shred. Be careful not to include any small bones.

Add chicken pieces to soup. Add packet of Ramen seasoning. Break Ramen noodles into halves or thirds. Add the rice. Cover, simmer for five minutes and serve. Accept compliments graciously!

Comment:  Serve with hot rolls, cornbread or crackers.

Comment:  I invented this soup about 20 years ago, and it has never failed to please.

 

Arrow

Have you ever made homemade chicken soup? It’s supposed to provide medicinal benefits for at least the common cold, and science backs that up. I just know it’s delicious. And soothing. And nothing warms a winter evening quite so well.

I’m thankful for each and every one of you!

Know what? I’d be as happy as turkey with a new snood if you would wander around my website a bit. To sign up to receive notices of new blogs, recipes, appearances and media news, leave your email address above. Y’all come back soon. I miss you already!

If you like Sassy, Danger and Mystery …  you’ll love my Young-Adult-to-any-age-novels! I hope you’ll pick up a copy of Silki, the Girl of Many Scarves: SUMMER OF THE ANCIENT. It’s available at your nearest Barnes & Noble Bookseller, on my website, Amazon, B&N.com and more. For your convenience, it’s also available for Kindlethe Nook and most other eBook readers.

Book Two of the Silki series, CANYON OF DOOM, launched right before Christmas. It’s available in paperback…and soon in all eBook formats. Here’s a brief synopsis:

Stealing money isn’t the aim of the Mesa Redondo bank robbers. They want the mysterious metal object Silki and her best friend Birdie discovered in the bogs at Canyon Daacha. With Birdie headed up to Kayenta for the rest of the summer, Silki navigates wide-eyed and solo through a whirl of thievery, scary characters, lost artifacts, and a shadowy stranger Silki dubs “Amber Eyes.” Against a backdrop of Monsoon season floods and quicksand, Silki’s plight is complicated by the hateful slurs of a rebellious cousin her family must rescue before it’s too late. Soon, Silki finds herself smack dab in the middle of a plot stretching all the way back to World War II and reaching right into the very soul of her own family.

I can’t wait for you to meet my new Canyon of Doom illustrator, the Drawing Hands!

Pssst! – All media used in my blogs are either acquired by payment for their use, or don’t require licensing for public use. Often, I use my own personal photos. Please play it safe and don’t recycle images, okay? (P.S. This one of Bette Davis and Henry Fonda is free for all. Borrow like crazy if you want!)

I told you borrowing unauthorized media would sour your stomach.

I told you borrowing unauthorized media would sour your stomach.

Jodi Lea Stewart was born in Texas and grew up in Apache County on a cattle ranch near Concho, Arizona. She left the University of Arizona in Tucson to move to San Francisco, where she learned about peace, love and exactly what she didn't want to do with her life. Since then, Jodi graduated summa cum laude with a BS in Business Management, raised two children, worked as an electro-mechanical drafter, penned humor columns for a college periodical, wrote regional western articles and served as managing editor of a Fortune company newsletter. She currently resides in Texas and New Mexico with her husband, two Standard poodles, two rescue cats and numerous gigantic, bossy houseplants. Silki, the Girl of Many Scarves: SUMMER OF THE ANCIENT is her first novel. CANYON OF DOOM is her second novel in the Silki, the Girl of Many Scarves series.

The Albuquerque Turkey


A Turkey's Life is Full of Peril

A Turkey’s Life is Full of Peril

As you probably already know, you can be the most beautiful or the smartest or the most gifted of turkeys, and you’re still going to get eaten.

My fellow turkeys don’t seem to mind; after all, they say—we all wind up in Turkey Heaven and that’s not so bad.

Lots of the old-timers who darned near died from that ornery new cowdog chewing on them  or from a certain brat, I won’t mention any names, who lives here on Hollyberry Farm and loves to throw rocks and rusty cans at us…anyway, those fellas come back from their near-passed-away experiences just gobbling with stories.

They say up there has majestic blue mountains with crystal waterfalls and silver feeders bulging with corn, oats, wheat, spelt, barley, and golden glow worms sitting there on the sides of the water troughs, smiling as they bend their little heads to wait for you to slurp them up.

Shoot, some of those old coots said they saw angels passing out emmer up there in that pearlized turkey paradise. If you don’t know what emmer is, you’re probably not a turkey. It’s Eurasian wheat first cultivated by the Babylonians, and it’s the tastiest thing this side of the cracked corn from Old Man Burnie’s Feed Store up there in Dango. Dango’s about 20 miles from the farm, but I guess that’s not important to my story.

My turkey lurkey friends wouldn’t know about emmer, or anything else, if I wasn’t so nice hearted and prone to share what I read in the newspapers I scrounge in the farm dump.

Fact is, I’m just not like the other turkeys. Not one bit. Smarter, I am, and lots more handsome. When I noticed the leaves turning that orangey brown yellow like they do when people get to eyeing us with that strange glint in their eyes, I decided right then I had to take action.

Mean Gene and me.

Mean Gene and me.

Here’s what I did first. I started hanging out with Mean Gene, the head rooster here at Hollyberry. I was dogging him one morning trying to turn my melodious gobble into a crow when my dang ol snood wrapped around my beak and guess what? I almost suffocated! Yep. Right there in the barnyard. I fell over gasping. Fred the duck waddled up quacking, “Your wattle is blue! Your wattle is blue!”

Can you imagine my mortification?

The Rafter TalksEveryone gathered around and made more fuss than if a rocket had landed right in the hay stack. Old Hurricane, the speckled guinea fowl and my best friend, is the one who saved me. She streaked right over and grabbed that snood with her beak. She ran underneath my head and flew over my neck, then back under my beak two or three more times until that thing came unwound and I could go about my business, which is what I did with no wasted time.

I sat in the shade of the tractor a long time until my wattle cooled down and I didn’t feel so ruffled. The whole rafter of barnyard turkeys was discussing me that day, that was plain.

Me as a Chicken. Pretty wonderful, isn't it?

Me as a Chicken. Pretty wonderful, isn’t it?

Next thing you know, I had Hurricane bite off the end of my snood and asked the lady turks to help me dye all my feathers a lovely russet brown. Now if that didn’t look like a chicken, what would? I hung out with those cackling biddies for oh, probably a week. My plan seemed to work fine until I overheard the farm missus telling the hired man,

“That turkey over there has gone plumb crazy. Musta fell on his head, the worthless, silly thing. Give him some extra feed, George, he’ll do fine this Thanksgiving.”

That shot me over the barn. I had to get away. Next bus came down the road, I was on it, brother, and I never even looked back once. That bus didn’t stop until it hit Florida, and I couldn’t get over those crazy trees sticking out of the ground with their green roots shooting in the air.

A slick  looking guy wearing a pinstripped suit and a straw hat was hanging around the bus station. He noticed me right away, and I have to say it made me nervous.  Next thing I knew, he sidled up to me and asked if I was one of the Underground Turkeys that flock to Florida to escape the knife. I almost went into shock! What could I do but shake my blue and grey head yes. He looked all around and handed me, secret like, a brown bag.

“Wear this and hang out on the beach for awhile and don’t make any waves,” he said. Told me he was a fowl rescue ranger and he understood my pain.

My Florida Costume.

My Florida Costume.

Now who ever heard of wearing a suit that looks like a headless turkey? But I did it. Oh, the humiliation I’ve known, but that doesn’t get us to the end of the story, so here I go. I learned something real quick—I’m just no good in tropical weather. It wasn’t long before I started getting mildewed feet.

That rescue guy, he suggested I move to Albuquerque. High. Dry. And he said he had a friend there who could probably get me a job as an assistant tour guide.

Well, son, I knew that was right up my alley, and I agreed to ride out there with a car full of turkey lovers, people—and I have to say they were awful nice except for that little toddler who tried to suck on my head when they weren’t looking. I sat right up there in the back seat on a stack of boxes and watched the scenery pass by all the way to New Mexico.

It was love at first sight! I was a New Mexican Turkey as soon as I crossed the line!

Now I can’t tell you where I live or work these days, because I’m incognito and part of the Underground Turkey Railroad Group. We have to lay low, and keep our beaks clean and not gab about our work.

RistraDo I miss Hollyberry Farm? Just a speck. Sometimes at night when I’m just about asleep under that nearly mile-high sky and the stars are twinkling just so and pine and sage smells are tickling my craw, I think about my friends from my other life. For one second, I get a little homesick, but then, I snuggle up to my red chilie ristra and go sound asleep.

In my heart of hearts I know I made the right decision. Next time you’re in Albuquerque, squint your eyes at the Sandia Mountains. Who knows? You might get lucky and see an Albuquerque Turkey darting across the ridges!

Arrow

Did I make you smile? Do you have any funny turkey stories? Please share…we’d love to hear them!

I’m thankful for each and every one of you! Happy Thanksgiving!

Know what? I’d be as happy as turkey with a new snood if you would wander around my website a bit. To sign up to receive notices of new blogs, recipes, appearances and media news, leave your email address above. Y’all come back soon. I miss you already!

If you like Sassy, Danger and Mystery …  you’ll love my Young Adult to any age-novels! I hope you’ll pick up a copy of Silki, the Girl of Many Scarves: SUMMER OF THE ANCIENT. It’s available at your nearest Barnes & Noble Bookseller, on my website, Amazon, B&N.com and more. For your convenience, it’s also available for Kindlethe Nook and most other eBook readers.

Book Two of the Silki series, CANYON OF DOOM, launches right before Christmas. Here’s a brief synopsis:

Stealing money isn’t the aim of the Mesa Redondo bank robbers. They want the mysterious metal object Silki and her best friend Birdie discovered in the bogs at Canyon Daacha. With Birdie headed up to Kayenta for the rest of the summer, Silki navigates wide-eyed and solo through a whirl of thievery, scary characters, lost artifacts, and a shadowy stranger Silki dubs “Amber Eyes.” Against a backdrop of Monsoon season floods and quicksand, Silki’s plight is complicated by the hateful slurs of a rebellious cousin her family must rescue before it’s too late. Soon, Silki finds herself smack dab in the middle of a plot stretching all the way back to World War II and reaching right into the very soul of her own family.

I can’t wait for you to meet my new Canyon of Doom illustrator, the Drawing Hands!

Pssst! – All media used in my blogs are either acquired by payment for their use, or don’t require licensing for public use. Often, I use my own personal photos. Please play it safe and don’t recycle images, okay? (P.S. This one of Elizabeth Taylor is free for all. Borrow like crazy if you want!)

When I think of all the media images illicitly borrowed, I just want to float down the Nile.

When I think of all the media images illicitly borrowed, I just want to float down the Nile.

 

Jodi Lea Stewart was born in Texas and grew up in Apache County on a cattle ranch near Concho, Arizona. She left the University of Arizona in Tucson to move to San Francisco, where she learned about peace, love and exactly what she didn't want to do with her life. Since then, Jodi graduated summa cum laude with a BS in Business Management, raised two children, worked as an electro-mechanical drafter, penned humor columns for a college periodical, wrote regional western articles and served as managing editor of a Fortune company newsletter. She currently resides in Texas and New Mexico with her husband, two Standard poodles, two rescue cats and numerous gigantic, bossy houseplants. Silki, the Girl of Many Scarves: SUMMER OF THE ANCIENT is her first novel. CANYON OF DOOM is her second novel in the Silki, the Girl of Many Scarves series.